Invited Speakers

Dr Andrew Bickerdike, Part-time Commissioner of the Australian Law Reform Commission
John Braithwaite, Australian National University, Canberra
Jeffery Hewitt, University of Windsor, Canada
Chris Honeyman, The Canon of Negotiation Initiative, USA
Professor Chris Marshall, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
Judy McCann-Beranger MA, Elder Mediation International Network, Canada
June Oscar AO, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Justice Commissioner, Australian Human Rights Commission
Justice Michael Pembroke, NSW Supreme Court
Joanne Potts, The Analytical Edge, Tasmania

Dr Andrew Bickerdike, Part-time Commissioner of the Australian Law Reform Commission

Dr Andrew Bickerdike was appointed as a part-time Commissioner of the Australian Law Reform Commission in June 2018, to the Review of the Family Law System. Andrew is CEO of Relationships Australia Victoria and Board Chair of Relationships Australia National. He holds tertiary qualifications in both economics and psychology and a Doctorate in Dispute Resolution. Andrew has experience and specialist training in individual, marital and family therapy, and family dispute resolution and has practiced as a mediator and family dispute resolution practitioner for over 20 years. Andrew is a former member of NADRAC (National Alternative Dispute Resolution Advisory Council) and current member of its successor, ADRAC (Australian Dispute Resolution Advisory Council). He is also Deputy President of the Mediations Standards Board and a foundation Board member of the Australian Chapter of the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts. Andrew has an interest in research and evaluation and has initiated and implemented many research projects examining the efficacy of family services programs, and in particular mediation services, in the naturalistic setting. These have resulted in conference papers and journal articles addressing the evidence for effective practice in counselling, family violence prevention and mediation services. He is an Industry Partner in three recent large Australian Research Council Linkage research projects. One of these is examining the effects of family violence on the process and outcome of mediation. Collectively these research activities have attracted national and international interest and have influenced the design of models of practice.

John Braithwaite, Australian National University, Canberra

John Braithwaite founded RegNet (The School of Regulation and Global Governance) with Valerie Braithwaite at the Australian National University.  The Centre for Restorative Justice in RegNet, which he currently co-directs with Miranda Forsyth, has been one of the important RegNet initiatives. Since the 1990s it has provided considerable leadership on R&D on restorative justice. The most important applications of the restorative justice work today are with peacebuilding and environmental regulation in a collaborative project with the Victorian Environmental Protection Agency funded by the Australian Research Council.

 

Jeffery Hewitt, University of Windsor, Canada

Jeffery Hewitt is Cree of mixed descent and is an Assistant Professor at the University of Windsor, Faculty of Law. His research interests include Indigenous legal orders and governance,  art and law, constitutional and administrative law, human rights, legal education, ethics, and business law.

Prior to joining Windsor’s Faculty of Law, Professor Hewitt has served as Visiting Scholar and McMurtry Fellow at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University as well as adjunct faculty at both Osgoode Hall Law School and the University of Toronto, Faculty of Law; was the 2015 Charles D. Gonthier Fellowship from the Canadian Institute for the Administration of Justice; and a 2013/14 McMurtry Fellow at Osgoode Hall Law School examining the relationship between Indigenous art and law. He is a past-President of the Indigenous Bar Association of Canada, and since 2002 served as General Counsel to Rama First Nation during which time General Counsel’s office received a 2011 Canadian General Counsel Award for Social Responsibility for work with First Nation Elders and youth.

Professor Hewitt holds an LLB and LLM from Osgoode Hall Law School and is called to the Bar in the Province of Ontario (since 1998); has served on various boards, including Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto; and is currently on the executive of Legal Leaders for Diversity. Professor Hewitt has delivered numerous guest lectures at law schools as well as to both the judiciary and the legal profession in his areas of research.

Chris Honeyman, The Canon of Negotiation Initiative, USA

Chris Honeyman has served as an adviser to numerous academic and practical conflict resolution programs in the U.S. and abroad, and as a mediator, arbitrator and in other neutral capacities in more than 2,000 disputes since the 1970s. Since 2003 he has been co-director of the Canon of Negotiation Initiative and co-editor of all its publications. Its new Negotiator’s Desk Reference (DRI Press 2017) supersedes the same editors’ Negotiator’s Fieldbook (American Bar Association 2006), which for more than a decade was widely recognized as the most comprehensive book available on negotiation. From 2007-2013 Chris was co-director of Rethinking Negotiation Teaching, a major project to revamp the content and methods of negotiation teaching worldwide. From 2004-2009 he served as lead external consultant to ADR Center (Rome), the largest dispute resolution firm in continental Europe. And from 1990-2006 he was director of a succession of Hewlett Foundation-funded research-and-development programs, of national or international scale. Chris is co-editor of six books and author or co-author of more than 100 published articles, book chapters and monographs on dispute resolution ideas, infrastructure, quality control and ethics. He has held a variety of committee and advisory roles for the ABA, the International Mediation Institute and other organizations.

Professor Chris Marshall, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Professor Chris Marshall is holder of the Diana Unwin Chair in Restorative Justice in the School of Government, at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. This is a partnership Chair jointly funded by the University, six public sector agencies and one private trust.

Dr. Marshall is author of seven books and well over a hundred articles, book chapters and reference work entries and has been widely used as a conference speaker and lecturer in a dozen countries around the world. He has won several awards, including the 2008 Award for Sustained Excellence in Teaching at Victoria University and the 2009 National Tertiary Teaching Excellence Award.

He is also a trained and experienced restorative justice facilitator and in 2004 received the International Community Justice Award from the Home Office in Britain for his work in campaigning for restorative justice. In 2015 he received the Michael Klug Award from the Resolution Institute for his “contributions to the peaceful resolution of conflict in the best interests of the community”, and in 2016 was granted Victoria University’s Excellence in Engagement Award.

Judy McCann-Beranger MA, Elder Mediation International Network, Canada

Judy McCann-Beranger M.A., Cert.CFM, Cert.EM, is the past Chairperson of the Elder Mediation International Network (EMIN), a Past President of Elder Mediation Canada, Board member of Family Mediation Canada, and Chair of Summits for EMIN. Judy is Employee Assistance Coordinator for Teachers in Newfoundland, Canada and is Chair of the Certification Committee for Family Mediation Canada. She is a comprehensive certified mediator, counselor, educator, and author and has been a guest lecturer at several universities across Canada and Europe. Judy is a past president of both Family Mediation Canada and Family Service Canada. Judy was team lead for a community-based research project to inform the practice of Elder Mediation.

Judy is the recipient of several National Leadership awards as well as an EMIN Award. Ambassador Patrick Binns on presenting the EMIN award at the Canadian Embassy in Dublin, Ireland congratulated Judy for her exceptional contributions to the advancement of elder mediation globally and remarked on her tenacity, leadership and inspiring work – both in Canada and abroad bringing together some of the greatest minds in the world on elder mediation. “The resultant positive impact on families around the world is to her credit” said Ambassador Binns.

June Oscar AO, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Justice Commissioner, Australian Human Rights Commission

June Oscar AO is a proud Bunuba woman from the remote town of Fitzroy Crossing in Western Australia’s Kimberly region. She is a strong advocate for Indigenous Australian languages, social justice, women’s issues, and has worked tirelessly to reduce Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). June has held a raft of influential positions including Deputy Director of the Kimberley Land Council, chair of the Kimberley Language Resource Centre and the Kimberley Interpreting Service and Chief Investigator with WA’s Lililwan Project addressing FASD.

She was appointed to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (1990) and was a winner of the 100 Women of Influence 2013 in the Social Enterprise and Not For Profit category. In 2015 June received the Menzies School of Health Research Medallion for her work with FASD. June has a Bachelor’s Degree in Business from the University of Notre Dame, Broome, Western Australia, and is currently writing her PhD. June is a co-founder of the Yiramalay Wesley Studio School and is a Community member of the Fitzroy Valley Futures Governing Committee.

In February 2017, she was awarded an honorary doctorate from Edith Cowan University. June will begin her five-year term as Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner on April 3, 2017.

Justice Michael Pembroke, NSW Supreme Court

Michael Pembroke is a writer, historian, judge and naturalist. He was born in 1955 and is the son and the father of army officers. He has lived and travelled extensively throughout the world, including in East Asia. At university, he studied History, French and Government intending to become a diplomat but instead turned to the law.

Michael obtained bachelors degrees in Arts and Law from Sydney University in 1978 and a Masters degree in law from the University of Cambridge in 1979. He practised in commercial law at the New South Wales Bar for almost three decades and was appointed as a judge of the Supreme Court of New South Wales in 2010.

Michael’s judgments are recognised for their concision and brevity, but he has extensive interests outside the law, including an abiding interest in leadership, dispute resolution and compromise – as forces for good in society and in international relations.

Michael has published three books: Trees of History and Romance (2009), Arthur Phillip: Sailor, Mercenary, Governor, Spy (2013) and Korea – Where the American Century Began (2018). Phillip was shortlisted for the Prime Minister’s Literary Awards (2014) and Korea has been currently short-listed for the NSW Premier’s Awards, the Queensland Literary Awards and the NIB Waverley Awards.

Joanne Potts, The Analytical Edge, Tasmania

Joanne is a highly regarded statistician, having completed both her Bachelor of Science (University of Melbourne) and PhD studies in applied statistics (University of St Andrews, Scotland). She has over 15 years work experience as a statistician within government agencies, academia and private industry. Since 2012, Joanne has run her own statistical consulting firm, The Analytical Edge Pty. Ltd., based in southern Tasmania. During this time, she has worked on a variety of nationally and internationally funded projects for state and federal government agencies, NGOs, private industry and academic researchers, advising on optimal survey design for data collection and ensuring management actions are guided by statistically robust analyses and results. The diversity of her role is vast, having worked on projects assessing impacts on endangered species from development and changing fire regimes; through to mapping and predicting disease spread; assessing risk of component failure in manufacturing, and ensuring women are provided effective pain relief during labour. More recently, her focus has been on science communication to the general public, and training researchers and industry consultants by running a series of workshops to ensure they are using current best-practice methods for analysing their data.